1. reptilefacts:


The turquoise dwarf gecko, also known as the electric blue gecko. Lygodactylus williamsi. A charismatic Tanzanian species, it’s rather like the TARDIS. It’s small. It’s blue. It’s enigmatic. And you never know where it might turn up next: zoos, pet shops, the Pratical Reptile Keeping magazine, obscure Tumblr blogs… And like the TARDIS, it’s here today, but it won’t be here tomorrow.
The turquoise dwarf gecko is under siege. And not from tiny pepperpot daleks either. Instead, this is a species that is being driven to extinction by the pet trade.
In its wild Tanzanian habitat, Lygodactylus williamsi can be found in just one single area: Kimboza forest. Within the forest, the gecko inhabits one singular type of tree known as Pandanus rabaiensis – the screwpine. Unfortunately, the range of these reptiles is shrinking yet further. Some trees, some areas of near-perfect habitat hold no geckos. The reason: they’ve already been bagged.
As a bright blue gecko with diurnal tendencies, these animals are easy to find in the wild. Overcollection quickly occurred. Even the females, which are normally green to brown (that’s sexual dimorphism for you) are easily sourced. Taking these animals from the wild is illegal as L.williamsi occurs within a protected area. So far, that hasn’t stopped the trade.
Several countries have already closed down their borders to these imports. The UK, at current, is not one of those countries. That blue gecko that you notice sitting in the pet shop might well be wild caught. Be careful.
The most important point to note is that the turquoise dwarf gecko can be easily bred in captivity. By following the caresheets that are now available, this bright blue reptile can be amazingly prolific. In other words, there’s no need to source wild-type geckos any more.
If you were planning to buy some of these reptiles, be careful with sourcing. If you already own some of these reptiles, it may be worth contacting other keepers to help with breeding. There’s a need for more hatchlings – and they can be surprisingly valuable in comparison to leopard gecko or bearded dragon juveniles.
Don’t let this little blue reptile get exterminated!
Further Reading:Flecks, M., Weinsheimer, F., Boehme, W., Chenga, J., Loetters, S., Roedder, D. (2012). Watching extinction happen: the dramatic population decline of the critically endangered Tanzanian Turquoise Dwarf Gecko, Lygodactylus williamsi. SALAMANDRA, 48(1), 12-20.
Maisch, H.,(2013). Reasons to feel blue. Zooquaria, 83(3), 24-25.
Nash, S. M., Brereton, J. E., (2013). The Plight of the Electric Blue Gecko. Practical Reptile Keeping, 57(1), 18-22.

[article written by James Brereton] [photo source]

    reptilefacts:

    The turquoise dwarf gecko, also known as the electric blue gecko. Lygodactylus williamsi. A charismatic Tanzanian species, it’s rather like the TARDIS. It’s small. It’s blue. It’s enigmatic. And you never know where it might turn up next: zoos, pet shops, the Pratical Reptile Keeping magazine, obscure Tumblr blogs… And like the TARDIS, it’s here today, but it won’t be here tomorrow.

    The turquoise dwarf gecko is under siege. And not from tiny pepperpot daleks either. Instead, this is a species that is being driven to extinction by the pet trade.

    In its wild Tanzanian habitat, Lygodactylus williamsi can be found in just one single area: Kimboza forest. Within the forest, the gecko inhabits one singular type of tree known as Pandanus rabaiensis – the screwpine. Unfortunately, the range of these reptiles is shrinking yet further. Some trees, some areas of near-perfect habitat hold no geckos. The reason: they’ve already been bagged.

    As a bright blue gecko with diurnal tendencies, these animals are easy to find in the wild. Overcollection quickly occurred. Even the females, which are normally green to brown (that’s sexual dimorphism for you) are easily sourced. Taking these animals from the wild is illegal as L.williamsi occurs within a protected area. So far, that hasn’t stopped the trade.

    Several countries have already closed down their borders to these imports. The UK, at current, is not one of those countries. That blue gecko that you notice sitting in the pet shop might well be wild caught. Be careful.

    The most important point to note is that the turquoise dwarf gecko can be easily bred in captivity. By following the caresheets that are now available, this bright blue reptile can be amazingly prolific. In other words, there’s no need to source wild-type geckos any more.

    If you were planning to buy some of these reptiles, be careful with sourcing. If you already own some of these reptiles, it may be worth contacting other keepers to help with breeding. There’s a need for more hatchlings – and they can be surprisingly valuable in comparison to leopard gecko or bearded dragon juveniles.

    Don’t let this little blue reptile get exterminated!

    Further Reading:
    Flecks, M., Weinsheimer, F., Boehme, W., Chenga, J., Loetters, S., Roedder, D. (2012). Watching extinction happen: the dramatic population decline of the critically endangered Tanzanian Turquoise Dwarf Gecko, Lygodactylus williamsi. SALAMANDRA, 48(1), 12-20.

    Maisch, H.,(2013). Reasons to feel blue. Zooquaria, 83(3), 24-25.

    Nash, S. M., Brereton, J. E., (2013). The Plight of the Electric Blue Gecko. Practical Reptile Keeping, 57(1), 18-22.

    [article written by James Brereton] [photo source]

    (via reptilesgalore)

    6 hours ago  /  204 notes  /  Source: reptilefacts

  2. fuckyeahmineralogy:

Vauxite with Quartz, Cassiterite; Siglo XX Mine, Llallagua, Bolivia

    fuckyeahmineralogy:

    Vauxite with Quartz, Cassiterite; Siglo XX Mine, Llallagua, Bolivia

    (via mineralogasm)

    8 hours ago  /  525 notes  /  Source: marinmineral.com

  3. (via earthataglance)

    1 day ago  /  36,057 notes  /  Source: nuttto

  4. sonjabarbaric:

James Balog, Chasing Ice

    sonjabarbaric:

    James Balog, Chasing Ice

    (via n-a-t-u-r-a-l-e-z-a)

    1 day ago  /  16,978 notes  /  Source: sonjabarbaric

  5. woodendreams:

(by Kilian Schönberger)

    woodendreams:

    (by Kilian Schönberger)

    2 days ago  /  4,498 notes  /  Source: 500px.com

  6. geogallery:

Fluorite

    geogallery:

    Fluorite

    (via mineralogasm)

    2 days ago  /  75 notes  /  Source: mindat.org

  7. reptiglo:

Trimeresurus albolabris by venomenonphotography on Flickr.

    reptiglo:

    Trimeresurus albolabris by venomenonphotography on Flickr.

    (via reptilesgalore)

    3 days ago  /  294 notes  /  Source: reptiglo

  8. funkysafari:

Mangrove or Shore Pit Viper - Cryptelytrops purpureomaculatus
by Michael Gillam

    funkysafari:

    Mangrove or Shore Pit Viper - Cryptelytrops purpureomaculatus

    by Michael Gillam

    (via n-a-t-u-r-a-l-e-z-a)

    3 days ago  /  221 notes  /  Source: funkysafari

  9. libutron:

Dioptase and Bayldonite | ©Fine Mineral Galleries
Tsumeb Mine, Tsumeb, Otjikoto Region, Namibia.

    libutron:

    Dioptase and Bayldonite | ©Fine Mineral Galleries

    Tsumeb Mine, Tsumeb, Otjikoto Region, Namibia.

    (via mineralogasm)

    4 days ago  /  174 notes  /  Source: irocks.com

  10. ggeology:

Polished Malachite and Azurite

    ggeology:

    Polished Malachite and Azurite

    4 days ago  /  728 notes  /  Source: trendtablet.com

  11. llbwwb:


(via 500px / just another day in Africa by Warren Fleming)

    llbwwb:

    (via 500px / just another day in Africa by Warren Fleming)

    5 days ago  /  932 notes  /  Source: 500px.com

  12. ruckawriter:

Witch’s Head Nebula,Wired Space Photo of the Day. Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech [high-resolution]

    ruckawriter:

    Witch’s Head Nebula,Wired Space Photo of the DayImage: NASA/JPL-Caltech [high-resolution]

    (via fuckyeah-stars)

    5 days ago  /  1,824 notes  /  Source: ruckawriter

  13. reptiglo:

Efesto - Goniurosaurus Araneus by eagle1_maledetto on Flickr.

    reptiglo:

    Efesto - Goniurosaurus Araneus by eagle1_maledetto on Flickr.

    6 days ago  /  103 notes  /  Source: reptiglo

  14. fairy-wren:

Great Hornbill. Photo by Meerkat

    fairy-wren:

    Great Hornbill. Photo by Meerkat

    6 days ago  /  576 notes  /  Source: treknature.com

  15. mineralia:

Andradite with Epidote from Afghanistan
by Dan Weinrich

    mineralia:

    Andradite with Epidote from Afghanistan

    by Dan Weinrich

    (via mineralogasm)

    1 week ago  /  272 notes  /  Source: danweinrich.com